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him about 18 days to make the passage from lasa to india, and during that time, president eisenhower received radio reports from the c.i.a. director, every other day. charting the progress of the tibetans, the c.i.a. had managed to train and put in place some agents, who could accompany the dalai lama on a very hazardous journey through the mountains, and eisenhower was in almost realtime getting information about what was happening. thanks to geshae. geshae was brought down to washington to a safe house in georgetown to translate the radio reports coming out of tibet about the dalai lama and his movement. once he was safely out, a full fledged guerrilla operation began. i think the tibetan national uprising in which some 85,000 tibetans lost their lives, was probably the high watermark of that resistance. many of the weapons that had been flown into tibet and parachuted down to the himalayas came as a result of the american support operation. the dalai lama himself never personally sanctioned this violence. in fact, he was very dubious and for a long time, the united states is the c
looking at 8% this year. >> this year. so maybe up to 9, maybe -- >> well,. >> and india is doing the same, do you think or is that -- >> i don't know. mi far less familiar with what is going on. but i think having had the election in india which the first time has given them a pretty strong mandate in the government, i think they will be able to move ahead much more easily than in the past where there have been so many political factions fighting to try and be on top of things. so i think india has the ability now to get into much stronger position than it was in beforehand. >> most people look at india and china as leading the economic recovery. and perhaps brazil coming in and then the united states and they see europe lagging. >> well, i would agree with you about this. china, india, brazil. i think they are already showing it. they are already goinging that far. 9 united states knew far better than i how things are going. but you still see both in the united states and in europe news of job layoffs and although the financial sector seems to be in less bad shape, let's put it that way,
. schools and colleges have closed for a week in india posit commercial capital mumbai to contain the spread of swine flu. officials say centimos will also shut. mumbai -- the worst affected in india where 11 of the country's 15 swine flu deaths occurred. a leading member of khmer rouge there ruled cambodia in the 1970's asked for harshest punishment at his trial for war crimes of murder. he tells the united nations- backed tribunal that he accepted responsibility for the sorrow and suffering of the 1 million cambodian people who lost husbands and wives. militants in northern afghanistan attacked a government building, killing a district police chief and at least one of his offices. the assault happened in the province where violence has increased in recent months. reports say the attackers struck before dawn with small arms and rocket-propelled grenades. starting a long gun battle. erin is here, so it is that time. we can look ahead to your business report. there are figures coming out -- a statement coming out of the fed in new york. >> the interest rate decision. but all expectations is i
,. >> and indias doing the same, do youhink or is that -- >> ion't know. mi far les familiar with what is going on but i think havi had the election inndiahich the first time has giv them a pretty strg mandate in the governmenti think they will be able to move ahe much me easily than in the past wre there have been so many political factions fighting to try and be on top of thing so i think india hashe ability noto get into much stronger position than it was in befehand. >> most people look at india and china as leading the economicecovery. and perhaps brazil coming i and then the united states and they see eure lagging. >> well, i wouldgree with yoabout this. ina, india, bzil. i thi they are already showing it. they a already goinging that far. 9 united states knew far better than i h things are ing. but you still see bo in the united stas and europe news of j layoffs andlthough theinancial sector seems to be in less bad shape, let's put it that way, the realconomy, one hopes against hope that things a going to look better. but you still kee reading about job layoffs. and until that allyurns,
. wouldn't that be nice. >>> okay. people in india are getting the keys to the cheapest car in the world, but what does it mean for the u.s. ando industry? hln money expert clark howard breaks down how the new car might help your wallet in the future. >> the nano car, the world's cheapest automobile, is now in people's drivesways in india. this car that you can buy in india for $2,500, that's right, a full four-door car seats four people, if you like a fifth you don't, it's now available and selling like crazy and be may wonder why am i telling but a car only available in india? well, big news. this car just passed the european union safety and crash test which are somewhat similar to ours, and europeans are already buzzing that they are going to be able to buy a car that even with the modifications for europe will end up being somewhere around $3,500. what about us? well, i want you to know for us this is a clear trend we are going to see in the next few years, cars cheaper than you ever imagined, about the price of a motorcycle. i am clark howard. for more ways to save, go to
of the europeans and particularly in conquered india, as the prime concern. we can easily think of m blocks today. hits observation in fact is one of the few solid and enduring principles of international and domestic affairs. well to keep in mind. at the food crisis is a case in point. it erupted first and most dramatically in haiti in the early 2008, and like bangladesh, haiti is a symbol of the utter misery. like bangladesh, when the european explorers arrived, they said they were stunned because it was so remarkably rich in resources. later it became the source of much of france's wealth. i am not going to run through this sordid history but the current food crisis traces back directly to woodrow wilson's invasion of haiti, which was murderous and brutal and destructive. among wilson's many crimes was to dissolve the haitian parliament at gunpoint, because if refused to pass what was called progressive legislation which would allow u.s. businesses to take over haitian lance. wilson marines then ran a free election in which the legislation was passed by 99.9% of the vote. that is of the 5% of
and india. is it critical that the united states try to play a role? that's on really problematic with respect to the indians in terms of defusing tensions between india and pakistan. is that outside 9 postal -- the portfolio of this group? >> it is outside the portfolio of my job. on the other hand, i am in constant touch with the indians. i met with the indians continually. the new ambassador in washington and i have had dinner recently and she and i are in close touch. i go to indio whenever the schedule permits. i stress we're completely transparent. the secretary of state and my close colleague assistant secretary for south asia, central asian affairs bob blake and i were in india recently and the indians are a major factor in the region. they're the dominant power. improveb -- improving u.s.-indian relations ha been a continual goal of the last three u.s.strations, all which i think have been successful in that regard, starting with president clinton's trip in 2000. i will keep the indians fully informed and i have an indian counterpart who i keep fully informed in india. >>
china is about 30%. if you look at 40 years down the line, china and india will be above that. so you have an enormous structure taking place and, therefore, a strong engine of growth. clearly, if the u.s. consumer was going to collapse again, i don't think the chinese, indian, brazilian consumer would be able to compensate. but if we have a stabilization, as i believe we will have in the western economies, i think that the marginal call is going to be on the emerging economies and i think that's the engine of growth. >> manford, what do you think? to believe what virginie said makes you think asia can decouple with what's going on in the rest of the world. >> i have to agree with her to a larger extent. the asian consumer is becoming more important. but the absolute numbers don't show it. it shows an increasingly large consumer. but we need the situation where the u.s. consumer does recover to at least a moderate extent. i don't think complete decoupling is a possibility. >> mamprett gill, thank you, thank you, virginie, as well. >> thank you. >>> west lb is refusing to comment on su
and i have proof of this. four or five weeks ago i was in india for the first time. very excited. very early in the morning about to visit the taj mahal and picked up the paper as i was going into breakfast and there was a picture of gabriel marquez whoever ran the newspaper new it was a face that readers would recognize. he was very well known in india and the story rather marquez would ride together. to be put on the front page in terms whether he would write again and the same would happen if you ask in india or turkey, they might or might not know but they do know those people who read. which is why i have asserted high maybe wrong, but he is perhaps the world's first global novelists. 100 years of solitude which he published in 1967 was the world's first global novel that would make sense because it makes the transition from what we call traditional society mainly preliterate society from technology society that most countries are. one of the things i discovered >> it appears in the headlines and latin american newspapers and they know what is peacock. >> one of the things that st
talking you with you. thank you very much. let's head out to india right now. mumbai for the latest on the india bit report. ayesha faridi joins us. hello, eayesha. >> thanks for that, christine. after a very tough day, more action seen for the broader market. while the sensex is a shade odd in the green, the crucial point, i think, is that is standing above that 4,700 mark. and it's the broader markets which have seen more. meantime, of course, a lot of things are really playing up. banking is one such bank. this led to the kind of recovery that we have seen today. so a couple of these counters and not just the heavyweight counters, development credit bank amongst the midcap banks had been showing you gains of about 5 odd percent. you've got axis bank is holding up by about 1.5%. icici bank, over a 3% move. l&t is doing out quite well. in the meantime, we have got a couple of news reports, still unconfirmed, that india plans to sue the euro union at the world trade organization at the wto for allowing big pharmaceutical companies to detain engine nettic drugs in transit to developi
billiton, marius kloppers. that's at 8:40 eastern. let's turn now to india. ayesha faridi joins us live from mumbai from the india business report. ayesha. >> thanks for that, christine. it's a bad wednesday for the indian economic markets. it's sliced through 4,600, 4,500 and has even broken the 4,400 market in trade today. it's recovered from the low point of the day. just about half an hour can ba, we were seeing 2% cuts for the sensex and the nifty. the bodder markets reeling under pressure there, as well. in fact, most technical analysts do believe that 43.50 thereabouts is now the next resistance thorn for the market. the big losers in trade are the entire technologies space. you've got realty which is facing a lot of pressure in trade today. so these are the two weak pockets. besides that, a whole hoeft of these heavyweight counters have also been weak. but economic data has been very positive. we have market expectations about 7.8% across the board growth, but currently, the market is more worried about the global weakness that we are seeing. with that, it's back to you. >> ayes
on india? we have the economy growing 6.1% in the june quarter. how sustainable is it once this sort of stimulus kind of wears off? >> well, it seems that, you know, all those countries that have been hit much harder than the u.s. itself, the u.s. was the epicenter of the crisis, but all the asia countries have been hit much harder and have fallen down further. so they rebound also in a stronger fashion. i think this is just a rebound of, you know, looking like more recovery potential. but i think, you know, as the u.s. is also picking up speed now in the third quarter. we should be quite a sustainable recovery across asia. >> yeah. we also have in japan, of course, a new government in place. we also have mixed data coming out, japan today. we have industrial output better than expected growing 1.9% in july, but retail sales also falling in july, as well. how do you think all of this is going to weigh on the bank of japan? >> well, we think that the bank of japan is going to keep the monetary policy for a considerable period of time. but certainly what we are now seeing is at least i
- the ceo's of ford, chrysler, and gm say they'll take a salary of just $1 a year. >>> officials in india are blaming pakistani terrorists for the ten violent attacks in mumbai last week. u.s. secretary of state condoleeza rice is visiting the area hoping to ease tensions between the countries. >>> a surprising number of teens admit they cheat on tests. in fact, a study found 64% of high school students do it. teachers and students say there's a lot of pressure on teens to succeed. >>> as if 14 olympic gold medals weren't enough -- swimmer michael phelps has won a new title. "sports illustrated" named him sportsman of the year. >>> that's headlines for this week, for "teen kids news, i'm lauren. >>> most kids are able to take their health for granted. but not those who have to cope with an illness that starts when you're young and lasts a lifetime. felipe tells us what it's like to manage a life threatening disease. felipe? >> reporter: jessica, it takes a lot of responsibility. kids who have type 1 diabetes can never put it out of their mind. >> when i first found out, i couldn't believe
choir talking to us live from long congress. >>> from talking about china, let's talk about india. ayesha faridi joins us live from india for the indian bit report. >> thanks for that, christine. the markets have picked up. 4,500 is back for the nifty. similar is the case for the sensex, as well. so you do have those pockets which actually give up their gains in yesterday's trade. for example, the entire auto basket is holing up strongly. tata motors is notching a 6.5% gain and you have the entire sugar pack on the kind of prices forming up. the entire sugar sector is picking up very, very much. we are picking up reports that the government has indeed chosen strife arkalap to be the generic formulation of tamiflu. they haven't got an official word from the government in terms of the kind of orders that they may actually bag and what sort of price appreciation or rather margin bump up it may lead to, but the stock itself is holding up very, very strongly in trade. meantime, 161 strains have been confirmed. with that, it's back to you. >> ayesha, thank you very much. in asia, yanzhou coal has agre
figures. outlook for the emerging markets, especially for india, that was very reassuring to investors. but holcim says it doesn't see a recovery before next year. are a part from that, we're watching ubs after the swiss government says said it will sell its ruffle 9% stake in the market until august. that will probably be somewhere around 70 so it will leave the swiss government with a nice profit here. overall, analysts are a bit more bullish especially that we heard the u.s. sacks has been signed yesterday and two major obstacles for ubs are out of the way. before i let you go, let me mention the swiss access data, we saw a drop of 27% from july so a small improvement compared to june when we saw a drop of 28%. that is it from zurich. >> thank you very much, carolin. the volumes are very low today. the french mngt is bouncing back after a flat session yesterday. total, the largest french oil producer, is up 2.3%. oil services, they are doing well on the back of increasing oil prices yesterday. also in good shape today, almost % higher, the dugmaker is boosted by a decision in the u.
unnecessary. on top of that, the huge expansion of economy such as china and india means that in our working lifetimes, the size of the european economy relative to address the world looks set to shrink dramatically. projections have shown europe's share of the world economy declining from 18% to 10% by the middle of the century, and even the united states is not immune from the effect of economic problems. this diminished economic weight will have a major impact on the ability of western nations to achieve their foreign policy goals. we are used to the idea of calling for economic sanctions against nations whose human rights records we find an acceptable. south africa under apartheid being a celebrated example. now we apply them to recalcitrant and regimes. it is already clear that the power of such economic weapons is declining. it follows from this analysis that it will decline much further in the years to come. what is more, much of the economic weight in the world is passing the countries which either do not fully share our concepts of democracy and human rights or for their own reasons
to pass a resolution in the u.n. council on human-rights. india, another rising power and the world's most populous democracy, is traditionally not inclined to support our western inclination to support human rights and economic pressure and military intervention. nor are many of the growing economic power centers in the world, brazil or in the call. not only has the world not converting around our own democratic norms, but according to a survey, global freedom to his third year of decline in 2008, but nearly powerful democratic nations do not share our view of how to conduct foreign policy. the liberal interventionism has generated much debate in britain. but the varying degrees, all have subscribed to it. the economic conditions have enjoyed some support as has military intervention in many countries. iraq being a much more controversial case, but heavily supported at the time. we're all agreed that we would try to intervene in another situation. but in the years and decades to come, the rise of other nations will constrain our ability to act in this way. a further constraint will come i
of inflation especially in areas such as india and china, if we start to see areas there, we'll see commodities sustained. i am against ru bin on this particular point.t. i think we will see a stronger move ahead. it's more inflation led. the cost of money being so low at the moment that's driving that price. if we start to see a tightening, then the commodity rally westbound able to be sustained. >> martin, always a pleasure speaking to you. xw >>> shares in barclays trading higher after a profit jumped 8% in the first half to just under $5 billion. the numbers were shy of forecast after impairment charges on corporate and consumer loans jumped 86%. the profit of the group's investment dropped from a year ago thanks to the acquisition of lehman brothers and commodity revenu revenues. speaking first, the president bob diamond, said the bank is getting conservative. >> it's getting easier and easier to see exactly how it's going to play out. we are expecting a difficult second half in the year in terms of provisioning. that's part of our plan. >> in china, more signs that the government is putti
for joining us. let's head over to india and join ayesha faridi live for the india business report. >> thanks for that, christine. standing or staring at that 1.5% gain for both the sensex and the nifty. might i add, it has come off from the top of the day. we're almost staring at a 100 point rally for the nifty just about a while ago. technology has been weak in trade today. watch out for counters. unitech amongst the real estate space, it's almost a tug of war space. reliance industries, which has an extremely high weighted in the index, that counter is flattened. but the rest of the market is looking good. telecom is definitely in focus. reliance communications now, we are expecting up from our sources that reliance communications is in talk for source based information up now. but that counter is holding up. more update coming in part and mtn, the deal is currently on and our sources indicate that the board will be meeting today. if it is conclusive, we can expect some agreement from the deal in the next ten days. the going has been good for that one. the metals space and the real estate
this market. and the sensex in india, only market trading on the up side right now, up 0.3%. overall, a weak picture here in terms of crude oil and nymex crude. down 21 cents. concerns about global demand weighing on this, nymex, $71.22 a barrel. brent is falling, as well, down 30 cents, $71.35 a barrel. mike, good to see you. how are the futures looking today? >> good afternoon, christine. good to see you, as well. and the futures at this point are looking like the dow is going to shoot for straight eight with seven consecutive days tying its longest win streak of the year. it looks like we could have a mixed open at least in about 5 1/2 hours time from now. moving on to the treasury market on the back of another relatively successful auction yesterday of two year notes and ahead of another auction today of seven year notes, we do see the bund yield creeping up at 3723%. yesterday, the price went up just a little bit on the benchmark ten year t-note and the yield came down and that trend is continuing, although it's basically unchanged with yesterday's close right now at 3.43%. and then mov
to call this glass new. it goes back to the origins of world trade to the east india company and hudson bay company. there is nothing particularly new to be a fruitless soldier and diplomat or preacher or businessman or woman for decades ibm employees have said the initial stand for i have been moved. what is new, the relos themselves, the breadwinners -- i will start -- what is new is growth in numbers of corporate relos, a figure i estimate to be about 10 million people, that is the breadwinners themselves and their families and how that has grown with the growth of the american economy. american foreign trade to cite a statistical the goods and services we buy and sell abroad has leaped from about $400 million in 1970 to over 3 trillion now as companies american and foreign compete. they need people to carry their banner and build business far from home. you've not heard the word reloville because i made it up. it is about workers and families frequently relocating, they are see real long-distance movers. the word relos originated among agents who specialize in catering to them. relo
: in addition to asean, the rmb can then be used as a trading currency with india, pakistan, russia, japan and korea. and the third step is to use the rmb globally. that's the general plan. >>reporter: actually, this is a huge plan - that's aimed at reducing the us dollar's dominance as an international currency. but first, beijing has got its work cut out. the country needs a social safety net to help through any financial shocks. and it should also liberalize its capital account and the convertibility of thecurrency. only then could the rmb hope to join the reserve currency club. >>song: and right now, we're not there yet. still we need a lot of time to build up china's capital market, banking system and also the social security and the insurance system. >>reporter: as for a time frame, the jury is divided - optimists cite 15 years, the pessimists 40 ! >>: for now, china will pay for brazilian sulphur in dollars. nonetheless, neighboring governments, eventhe us, welcome measures, albeit modest, that allow greater international use of the rmb. but some asean traders still need convincing.
or india or iraq or indonesia where they end up and things have soared sort of hidden values. religion fascinates me so you get the southeast asian religious figures of course, but it tells us to behave ourselves, a little stream, put it around your neck. it is a begging bowl from afghanistan picked up in a bizarre. the work is very fine if you look and the thing is you don't want to publish something like this. let the dirt of the sentry on it. my brother gave me these for christmas because we had some when we were children and it's just a reminder of when we were kids. they are called britain's, these little soldiers. but the most important thing in this room by far even more important than the books, pictures of my wife. they are all over the house. when i write, my goal is not to disappoint my wife, not to dismay her. it doesn't mean i want to make her angry. we want to disagree on things but my test is have i written sufficiently honest with enough integrity to pass the kathryn mcintyre peters test and i have another test at penn state as an undergrad back in the 60's, 70's when i
night live alumnus chris kattan starring in a new ifc miniseries called bollywood hero. he goes to india to star in a movie. look at your moves, chris kattan. how did you learn those moves, by the way? >> those moves took me about seven years to learn. >> come on. >> no. seven weeks. >> you really went to india to shoot this? >> we shot in on location in mumbai, india. i went there for ten weeks. >> had you been before? >> no, it was an experience. >> quite the cultural shock. >> it was. but after ten weeks you get used to it. it is very beyond. it was intense but this was such a great, great project to do. it was just so much fun. as you said, i play a heightened version of myself. i go over there to break into the movies there. >> what do they make over you? >> in reality or on the show? >> in both. >> they're nice. they like me. i smile. >> how about in the movie? >> the movie? this movie? >> he gets the girl in the movie. >> yeah, i get the girl. it is actually a miniseries. three parts on ifc thursday, friday and saturday. >> that's not the girl you get, is it? >> no, that's the gra
for that report. >> in india, ayesha faridi joins us live for the india business report. >> we participated in the global rally today. yesterday it clocked a new high for ourselves and the nifty clocked that or cruised past that 4,700 mark. today, the markets chose to consolidate. the biggest drav dragger is oil and gas heavyweight, which is why you're seeing the nifty break away and increase those values. tata motors is your biggest gainer for today, at almost 6.5% gains. there are also rumors in the market that they may get the loan guarantee approved for the government for bridge loan acquisition of land rover. besides that, most of the commodity stocks have been doing very well. you've got auto ancillary stocks looking very well. the monthly sales numbers that came out for auto stocks and infillry stocks are picking up in trade amid the mid and the small caps are holding up, as well. >>> elsewhere, we are looking at euro's biggest bank, hsbc, the company could soon be one of the first foreign companies to list in shanghai. reuters says it could raise up to $7.3 billion in a shanghai ipo
is the most cluttered room in the house i tend to be a little more austere but from pakistan or india or an iraq or indonesia weird you end up? but they do have some hidden values religion fascinates me but the southeast asia and religion figure of buddha telling us to be gave ourselves put strings around it is a begging bowl from afghanistan. the work is a very fine and if you look you do not want to polish to something like this. my mother gave me these because we're a little when we were children we had some. it is a reminder of when we were kids. they are called britons, these little mental soldiers. but the most important thing in this room, by far, even more important than books, pictures of my wife. they are all over the house. she is slavic but when i write, my goal is not to disappoint not to dismay i do not want to make per angry but my test really is and i have written a sufficiently honestly with enough integrity to pass the catherine mcintyre peters test roi also have another test at penn state as the underground -- undergrad in the late '60s when it was voted number one
's partnership with history which has managed to india the corporate culture even today. unfortunately, although some people would disagree, i think regulators need to get more involved. and having a system whereby a group of bankers is essentially free to develop as fast as they went to the degree that they want with very little external oversight, journalists and regulators and politicians and somehow hope that they will, through sheer goodness of spirit and collective rationality, will keep their activities in check and not go mad, is naive. baking is too important to be left to bankers alone. if the people who run nuclear power plants were paid kilowatt of energy they pump out, so you have to pump out as much as they can and the more they pump out, the more successful they look, it would be over by now. we need to look in banking to other kinds of activity and ask what lessons we can learn about risk control. one of the ironies that everyone talks about, financial engineering, if you are actually an engineer building bridges, you talk about things like safety margins, risk, your talk to deba
the economy, reduce the number of jobs, weaken the businesses, guarantee that china and india will outcompete us in of the world market and the only alternative to that is real change. you're not going to be able to get cleverly from here to a better future, as long as the system, whether it's at the state level or the federal level is dominated by structures of special interest, whose entire future is a function of bigger bureaucracies, more spending and higher taxes, so i hope i've at least made 18 nibble case that what we need is a dramatic level of change. what i would like to do is take a five minute break and come back for c-span, but i appreciate you giving us this much time to outline the initials, and then we'll start with questions right after the break. [applause] [inaudible conversations] [inaudible conversations] >> our liver coverage of this forum on the government budget process will continue in a moment. former house speaker newt gingrich will take questions from the audience an we'll continue our live coverage in just a moment. in the meantime, here's a conversation about the
%. there will be a mass exodus of our manufacturing in this nation. they can go to india and china and have lower wages, lower costs. what is going to keep them here. >> you have raised to a very important questions. -- two very important questions. on cap and trade, the house of representatives have passed a bill that has a lot of problems. we have not gotten a bill in the senate. we understand the kinds of concerns you have raised. we're going to take them up and see to it that we do not have the consequences of exporting jobs or imposing a great tax. you raise a question of employee choice. that bill is in the process of being negotiated. there will not be a time line which will be so fast that people will not have an opportunity to understand what the issue is. you comment about the secret ballot, and i think we have to maintain a secret ballot, which you agree with. we're trying to work through the other facets of it on arbitration, but bearing in mind the concerns and worries that you have raised. no. 24. who has 24? yes, sir? don shapiro in 1997, i was diagnosed with a thyroid condition that put
toehave sod withly. >> charlie: but a lo she en goes to india,o kenya, correct? yes. >> charlie to happy valley, was it? >>called hay valley. became known as happy valley afte everye learned about the game she was playing. >> crlie: but that'shen it gets interesting, isn't it? >> yes. it gets extremelyinteresting. therwas an abandonedme of the social rule there. idena's mother, grandmother broken socia rules, her mother d been a keyoman sufferragist introduced the laboparty. anddivorced h husband spectacularl broken the rules in this way. idena chose to break the rules she did so in kenya. by behaving sexually as men could. it was more permissib for men to take multipl lover idena -- >>harlie: decided she could. >> yes. it was also extreme intereing in terms of kenyan life wasextremely -- africa is fantastic continent. 's hop not i can,life there is very exciting becse you're on the edge of physil danger so much of the te. idena had farm there, she was a ve successful farmer,e bred e best jersey dairy herd. she introduced the crop, worked very hard but that also mnt they playe veryard.
people injured. the first earthquake was a magnitude 7.6 in indian ocean near india's andaman islands. the second quake was a 6.5 magnitude near tokyo. tsunami warnings issued but later taken back. >>> the same state senator called for sanford to resign after having an affair and now this republican calls for sanford to resign after book in first class flights to european. and he says they are wrong. >>> police are looking for man holding a gown a woman's head during a bank robbery. it shows the man pointing a gun toward a teller and threatens to take a customer hostage. the woman was able to get away but the suspect did take some money. >>> talk about somehow getting lost in translation. secretary state hillary clinton got angry during a q&a session with congolese university student. the student speaking in french asked what president obama would think about chinese financial contracts with congo. but the translator apparently made a mistake and asked secretary clinton what mr. clinton would think. that didn't go over very well. >> you want me to tell you what my husband thinks? my h
in india what's your game plan there. >> first of all, we explored how we could work together. the reality is that we didn't get a. agreement on, you know, vj's price expectations. having said that, we pass a very good friend. i think he admires our portfolio. i have a huge respect for his business. but today, nothing with all discussions. >> paul walsh, thanks so much for joining us. we appreciate it. >> thank you. >>> all right. let's check those futures once again for you. we're just kind of hashing around here close to fair value. dow supposed 1.20. right around fair value. no big deal at the open unless something changes dramatically. >> something exciting could happen. >> yeah, you never know. >> never know. >> someone can issue a press release or make a statement and we could be -- >> we could try and do something exciting. >> -- off to the races. >> we might have something really exciting planned. no, okay. anyway. >> i don't think we have anything planned. anyway, time to get the word on the street. here on the floor is warren meyers, cnbc market analyst, pepperdine, hardest worki
the painful answers for seattle's mystery man. >>> and field of dreams. a reality show in india proved again that dreams really do come true and these two men are proving it, playing a little baseball, down in florida. early this saturday morning, august 22nd, 2009. captioning funded by cbs >>> hi, everybody. welcome to "the early show" here on a saturday morning. i'm chris wragge. >> iraq erica hill. great to have you with us today. august 22nd already. >> it is crazy. you know what is crazier? there are some children back to school. for some of you parents, it is a good thing. but kids back in the schools in mid-august. >> parts of the country, they're back. >> for those of you that aren't back yet or don't have everything you need, you're in luck. we're doing a little back to school bargainista shopping today. live to an office depot in new jersey, we'll go up and down the aisles, find you the best deals for everything you need on that list. >> the best time to shop now at 7:00 a.m. eastern. >> no one is in the store. grab a cup of coffee after "the early show" and head on out. >> we all
american jobs here, create jobs for americans. i called one time to the help lines and i was calling india. i want to talk to an american. we could use that money to lower the deficit here. that is about all i have to say. host: one of the headlines this morning is in the front page of "the washington post." ben bernanke to be reappointed as the fed chairman. we will hear from the president in about 35 minutes live from martha's vineyard, the renomination. senate confirmation hearing the fall. the reappointment would take effect in january of next year. we have and we will continue to be covering these town hall meetings here on this network all this week. we will show you a cross section of democrats and republicans as they meet with their constituents. one of the hearings will be live tonight in northern virginia, a town hall meeting from the reston, va., with congressman jim moran. joining him will be former chairman of national democratic committee, former dr. and governor of vermont, howard dean. a writer for the fairfax county * will be at the town hall meeting and also with freshman
and demonstrations of around india against the united states. bald was the reason? was their something, that found some kind of underground connections or why -- he was in the u.s. dozens of times in the past and there was no problem at all. >> i actually think that the ambassador, our ambassador to india put out a statement on this case. beyond that i think i will defer to the department of homeland security. >> are you a thinking [inaudible] harassment, he feels since he was coming round the usa [inaudible] >> i am not equipped to comment on the case at this point. >> this has gone back to an older issue but it is again a new u.s. ambassador is starting in london and the mayor of london's office as well as members of the london assembly are calling for the u.s. to reevaluate its policy on congestion fees for the city and what the united states to pay 3.5 million pounds of fees' they say the united states owes. >> is there any change of policy coming or would you consider changing policy based on new ambassador? >> our policy does not change with the change of ambassador. >> what is the policy? >
it goes back to the origins of world trade, as far back as the east india company and hudson bay company, nothing particularly new to being a diplomat or preacher or businessman or woman. for decades, ibm employees have said the initials stand for i have been moved. what is new? the growth of the numbers of corporate freeloaders. the breadwinners, i will start -- what is new is the growth in the numbers of corporate relos, a number i estimate to be ten million people. the breadwinners and their families and how that has grown with the growth of the american economy. american foreign trade, to cite a statistic, all the goods and services that we buy and sell abroad, from $400 billion in 1970 to over $3 trillion now. as companies, american and foreign, they need people to carry their banner and build business far from home. you have not heard the word relosville because i made it up. they are cereal long-distance movers. the word relos probably a originated among suburban real estate agents who specify in catering to them. relos tend to reduce the tween moves in relovilles, suburbs caterin
statements by secretary clinton wishing the government, the pakistan and india a happy birthday, had the independent state. -- independence day. the secretary is airborne coming back to washington, d.c. after her compelling trip to africa. she met this morning before departing with prime minister jose mavis but obviously the trip represents the commitment the of all administration and the secretary to the partnership with africa. obviously a great deal of discussion over the past 12 days about reform on the continent, the lipitor, judicial police, constitutional, but stability and in the different parts of africa to somalia the united states interest both in promoting trade between africa and the united states but also promoting trade among the states of africa, a great deal of discussion paid to the outstanding pepfar efforts in the continent both in terms of combating hiv/aids but also malaria and the trip to omar where she focused on the crimes of gender based violence and very direct conversations with a number of countries about the imperative of good government, good governance
limited. >>> from china, let's switch gears and head to india. ayesha joins us for the business report. >> it's been a volatile monday. asia was holding up. started off on a positive note. within minutes of trade it slipped down. around the 4500 level. just marginally holding. that's the case for the broader markets as well. what's dragging the indises down is the monsoon worries, which still hasn't picked up in certain key regions of the company. you have a couple of monsoon sectors. big draggers today. unilever stocks one of the losers today. what's gaining on the flip side is the entire i.t. sector. they are maintaining a good 6% gain right now. of course, pharma is holding up pretty well. in the meant, talking about monsoon, the worries clearly continue. they have actually stayed down the long-term forecast to 80% from the previous 95%. that as the market is watching. meantime, the swine flu death toll has risen in the country. in fact, it's gone up to six, with two deaths reported this morning in all. so that, of course, is bringing a flurry of activity with the entire pharma pack
last week. this market is up 1.1% today. the hang seng up 1.7%. and the sensex in india up 2.4%. in terms of nymex and crude, it is up on recovery, hopes that demand could be picking up. crude at $73.80. down two cents. brent as well, down five cents, $74.13 a barrel. a little bit of a putback in terms of nymex and brent. let's cross live to tokyo and check in on the trading day from the nikkei. >> thanks, christine. tokyo stocks rebounded sharply monday. they closed 3.35% higher. verch investors were hearted by friday. the market jumped 8.4% while cannon gained 3.6%. hitting the year to date another. the nikkei reported that the firm stands a chance of pushing profit in the year ending next march instead of the projected 10% decline. >>> meanwhile, polls are projecting a landslide victory for the main opposition party. investors are even more concerned that dpj lawmakers have been calling for tighter regulations on the consumer finance industry. confirming the nikkei report, the second largest convenience store operator lawsan, and matsumotokiyoshi have announced they will f
%. they could go to india or china and have lower wages that have lower cost. what is going to keep them? [applause] >> you have raised two very important questions. on cap and trade, the house has passed a bill which i agree with you has a lot of problems. we have not gotten a bill in the senate. we understand the concerns to have race. we will take them up and see to it that we do not have the consequences of exporting jobs or imposing a great tax. raised the question of employee's choice. that bill is in the process of being negotiated. there will not be a time line which will be so fast that the people will not have an opportunity to understand what the issue is. you have to maintain a secret ballot, which you agree with. we are trying to work through arbitration. we're very high-minded the concern to have raised. no. 24. yes, sir? >> in 1997, i was diagnosed with a thyroid condition that put me in the hospital in a coma. i need to thank all the taxpayers for paying for four years of hospitalization for me because i did not have a plan by could afford at the time. i spent a lot of ti
, and india. jane: concerns today about flood controls built to protect new orleans in the wake of a hurricane. a federal investigation found that they may not work. the army corps of engineers installed new pumps after katrina and were supposed to be able to pump millions of gallons of water out of the city, which is below sea level. they were not tested, and cost hundreds of millions of dollars. now the federal office of special counsel calls them unreliable. the army corps of engineers could have saved for another $30 million buying equipment proven to work. so far, the court has declined comment on this study. we will let you know if they do make a statement. jon: harris faulkner continues with breaking news on the throgg's neck bridge in new york city. >> this is been the scene of real problem since the start of the renovation on this bridge. today, it actually includes a fatality. this is the scene we have been showing you all morning long. a worker has fallen near craned -- near a crane. work has been done on this heavily traveled bridge, and it just reopened recently to heavy trucks af
on the india business report. >> following it up from asia, down by 50 points for the nifty right now. almost over 1%, though it's recovered from the low point of the day. we were staring down by about a 2%. you are seeing heavyweight selling, beat up markets are selling off and you are seeing institutional selling coming in. so reliance industries or in gc, both of these counters are giving off a lot by way of momentum. you have counters from the entire real estate space like unitech and glenn mark pharmaceuticals, that is one count which is in focus and trade today. here is perhaps the reason why. forest labs currently says they did not show positive results in the phase 2b trials pop so any jerk reaction coming in on opening bell. the counter was down about 18 odd percent. still continues to suffer, down about 14% on last count. some bit of recovery in ranbaxy, idn and a couple of other counters which have which has sold off a bit in the last week or so. with that, it's back to you. >> ayesha faridi, thank you very much. and it's back to becky now. >> the world is focusing on the economic
, but usually alone or with their mom. chelsea clinton with her mother, india, many places. this is the first in recent memory that i've seen where they travel as a family. with the father. this is a great opportunity to see some places and learn some things. i would say that this is a family that likes to be together. >> i'm always mindful that the pressures of the job not get in the way of me spending time with malia and sasha. >> reporter: but is the travel inappropriate at a time of recession? katie couric asked the president. >> do i think the american people think that, because those hardships, i shouldn't spend a little time with my daughters? i don't think that's how the american people think about it. >> reporter: the obamas see this as a family learning experience to travel with their children, and the white house points out that the obamas pay for all the travel costs associated with the children's travel. and camp obama, by the way, isn't over. it continues next week at martha's vineyard. julie? >> can i enroll? you and me both, bill. bill plante outside the white house. thanks a
that these people have access in how the world is governed and what opportunities young people have been india, brazil and developmentally 30 years ago with more anbar but they know in the arab world they have slipped further and further behind. the desire to join the rest of the world as part of a global trend is a very powerful tool. >> thank you. other questions or comments? >> originally i am from somalia. the last two months i have had a glimmer of hope one of these was the center for training of human rights event of. we have just launched and i found an activist double feature from bahrain particularly. and women with the traditional attire and some of them went to the trainings but they point* out the difference but together [inaudible] one person from doha was not that much educated but taking a real issue in his country at one point* they said he should be removed from the meeting. so i am thinking that the possibility of the incite with some newspapers the other is the establishment is part of the commission for human rights. where independent people come together maybe this is the
to other countries like india or thailand for medical tourism. >> one of the many ads ot issue of health care. americans for prosperity took a look at the canadian system. we'll watch it, come back, and get your reaction. >> i survived a brain tumor. but if i had relied on my government, i would be dead. i'm a canadian citizen. and as i got worse, my government health care system told me i had to wait six months to see a specialist. in six months i would have died. >> some patients wait a year for vital surgeries. delays that can be deadly. >> many drugs and treatments are not available because government says patients aren't worth it. >> i'm here today because i was able to travel to the u.s. where i received world class treatment. government health care isn't the answer and it sure isn't free. >> now, washington wants to bring canadian style health care to the u.s. but government should never come between your family and your doctor. learn more at patients united >> my advice to americans, as patients it's your care. don't give up your rights. >> until earlier this month, u we
report to hit land based targets, could be a threat to india. the action may mean new tensions between the u.s. and pakistan over the weapons development and could trigger an arms race with india the u.s. tried to end and pakistan denies this accusation. well, presidents, family and friend gave a final farewell to senator ted kennedy at a two hour service at the bah celica of our lady of perpetual health in boston. one of the; is that right's sons, ted kennedy, jr. remembered his dad. >> he said, teddy, republicans love this country just as much as i do. and one of those wonderful experiences that i will remember today is how many of his republican colleagues are sitting here right before him. that's a true testament to the man. >> the senator's final resting place is at arlington national cemetery next to his brothers, robert and john f. kennedy. an autopsy of celebrity disc jockey dm. more tests are planned. remembering the last time he was heard from 1 a.m. on friday when he sent a text message to two budies planning a trip to legislation. he was found dead with a crack pipe and a h
. gobbing infants from the roof of a mosque in india. >> alysin: line? >> clayton: hundreds of babies under the age of two or shaken in the air like that for being dropped off the roof of the b merger got the shrine in western india. despite protests from child's local officials say there are no reports of injuries. steve i would never got to the why. there are 5w's in the news story >> clayton: brings good luck to the child for the rest of their life. she won that one doesn't look like he feels he is lucky speak either need therapy to rest of their lives. >> clayton: the best part is you grow up, you don't know you got dropped off a roof. a jimmy, when you're just a baby we dropped you off the roof of "fox news" building out here beside that's not healthy. let's talk health care reform. it takes a huge step forward on friday. the house fortunate last-minute compromise. joining us from washington is caroline shively. caroline, this book came in very late. a long busy day in the house, right? >> right, the vote did not come down until after 10:00 o'clock. the house commerce committee voted o
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